Books

Beginners Tips for Buying and Selling Books On Amazon

If I mentioned you can turn on your own personal computer today and almost immediately grab a share of a 5 billion dollar business with more than 3-5 million busy clients – which is also one of those planet’s best- famous brands, would you trust me? Not. But I have to inform you personally – with a bit of work and effort – possible.

Amazon’s book-selling site is one among the planet’s most prosperous e-commerce businesses, accounting for in excess of 5% of all on-line income. And the staggering fact is the fact that Amazon will gladly enable you to share in their success narrative. Are they crazy? No. It really is really a testament to creator Jeff Bezos’s assignment to be ‘the very customer-focussed business ever’. Are there any catches? Maybe not too really. Clearly, nothing is that simple but if you knowhow and therefore are ascertained it is a opportunity worth your serious concern.

Inside this article you are going to discover how Amazon can assist you to set your online business. A small business which will market for one worldwide twenty four hours every day, 365days a year, together with virtually no overheads and not one of the hassles or dangers normally related to e-commerce Amazon seller blog.

Why-on-earth should I sell books?

Well, you really do not have to offer books. You are able to sell all sorts of different goods on Amazon now – which include photographic and electronics tools, audio, DVD’s, movies, applications, personal computer and video games, house and garden toys and toys and titles.

But novels satisfy virtually every requirement of the ideal email order merchandise. They’re streamlined, light and simple to send, simple to describeand love a higher gain margin and a top selling price relative for their own size – that they really have a worldwide market place and so are something that just about everyone else buys at some moment. Novels remain Amazon’s core industry, their main seller and also, to cap it all, there’s not any better known global market for more books compared to Amazon.

However, doesn’t eBay do it? I am sometimes questioned why anybody would rather sell books (or anything else) on Amazon instead of on that creature of e-commerce e bay. The solution is straightforward: Amazon has certain unique advantages within eBay, also for certain products it knocks its bigger brother to some cocked hat. First of all, attempting to sell Amazon isn’t (normally) a auction. You find the selling price you’d like, and also that you don’t need to wait for a week to get it. It is quicker and simpler to list products available on Amazon and also you don’t have store relisting, so that you can sell more (some sellers have more than one million product traces). Often, it’s much cheaper to sell goods and that means that you can promote for less yet produce more. Lastly, as opposed to eBay Amazon’s administrative and payment processes are a cinch – when you offer a book all you want to do is set it into the client.

Okay there are a few snags: Amazon’s rules and procedures are a bit daunting in the beginning. But stick to it. It all slots into place when you are running and up. There can also be quite a fair piece of rivalry at a few niche areas ( about the best way to supercharge your competitors later).

Just how Amazon allows you to talk about their achievement

There are actually quite some ways in which you can join in Amazon’s achievements narrative. Amazon Auctions is much exactly the exact same as e bay. Amazon Advantage is really for authors and publishers. Amazon Alliances are unique functioning relationships with significant businesses. However, if you should be a private-seller-cum-small-trader or a small-mediumish sized business I think you’ll find Amazon’s Marketplace and zShops are the most useful ways of getting concerned.

Market-place: market place extends to you a chance to sell books onto precisely the precise very same page in Amazon’s website in which Amazon market the publication by themselves. Therefore you get to contend together with them head-on, and even get to undercut them on price tag (actually you’re anticipated to!) . Market place is for almost any brand new or used novels, however, not very rare or collectable ones. Selling prices will be mended – Marketplace isn’t a auction. You may list an unlimited number of goods for free. A final commission of 86p (around Amazon.co.uk) for every item plus 17.25 percent one’s selling price is charged on each individual sale however you really don’t pay any such thing if your novels don’t promote.

The New Mexico Film Industry, a Good Fit for All

The Motion Picture Association of America regularly reports on the millions of dollars pumped into the New Mexico economy thanks to its robust film industry. Beyond cast and crew pay, the hospitality and tourism sectors see a direct infusion of industry money throughout the year. Local artists, support services and specialists are often tapped to meet very specific needs for productions filming around the state. Textile artist Wynema Chavez and Santa Fe actor Daniel Williams are just two of hundreds of locals who’ve found their niche in movies, television series and new media productions that set up shop or are created right here in New Mexico.

Chavez, who is from Santo Domingo (Kewa) Pueblo, got her start as a costume and wardrobe department staple when word of mouth about her talents as textile designer reached a movie set in need of someone capable of dyeing and distressing fabrics and objects. She was brought in to work on that production, and has worked in the local film industry full-time since 2010. Her credits include Wild Hogs, Terminator: Salvation, The Book of Eli, Breaking Bad, The Lone Ranger, Longmire, and many more. “The industry has done some amazing things for me personally and professionally,” she says. “Whenever a film from NM is released, it creates a sense of pride for the people who worked on it, our families, friends and the state in general. There are so many aspects to film and it touches so many lives. I enjoy when films partner with our communities. They show future generations they can work in our industry too.”

After 20 plus years as a classroom teacher, actor Daniel Williams says, “I chose to step away from the increasing administrative pressure on teachers to focus on testing and administrative agendas to embrace my own dreams of acting and, hopefully, a more prosperous lifestyle for my family.” Now, just three years into working in the film industry, by utilizing his past experiences as an EMT, retired military serviceman and teacher, Daniel is in high demand for his wide range of character portrayals in front of the camera. In addition to his work in over 70 student films, feature films and indie productions, his teaching career lives on behind the scenes as a set teacher. Daniel goes on to say, “I love the film industry and the very tangible hope that it offers to New Mexicans and their families.”

Productions big and small are consistently booking area studios and filming locations, with summer being a particularly busy season for state’s film business. The sound stages at Santa Fe Studios, Garson Studios at Santa Fe University of Art and Design, and Bonanza Creek Ranch are churning out movies and series. Both Albuquerque Studios and I-25 Studios in Albuquerque are booked with multiple crews, filming shows for NBC, the El Rey Network, the CW and AMC. Santa Fe Studios is home to a new western mini-series entitled Godless for Netflix, produced by acclaimed filmmaker Steven Soderbergh, while season five of the network’s hit series Longmire wraps up its season in the area. Both cities and other areas around the state are also playing host to the third installment of the Wolverine movie franchise, starring Hugh Jackman.

The Problem With Movies and How to Solve Them

Modern movies are a glorious thing, but they are also rife with problems. Modern movies are falling into a set of weird choices, and odd habits that can make watching movies into a sort of nightmare. Since there are so many problems with movies I decided to tackle two of them here, and we will revisit this issue in another article.

The first problem I have is poor audio mixing. What do I mean by this? Let’s say you open up your mailbox and you have a couple movies from Netflix sitting there (I almost made this example driving to Blockbuster, but then I remembered it was 2016). You pop in the Blu-Ray/ DVD into your player of choice and you sit back and you have to turn the volume down because there a lot of explosions and such. Then people start talking and you have to find the remote because they might as well be whispering! Then another explosion and now you’re deaf because the damn thing was so ear piercingly loud. This can be annoying. Hell it’s one of easiest ways to take me out of a movie, to be honest. So why does this happen? Well when the audio for movies is mixed, they mix it for a 5.1 or 7.1 surround sound setup because that is the optimal way to watch a movie. You see, in 5.1 surround sound each speaker has its own job. The center speaker handles dialogue, the 2 side speakers are for explosions and “bwaam” noises in Christopher Nolan movies, the subwoofer is for “dat bass”, and lastly the 2 (or 4 if you have 7.1) satellite speakers are for the surround effects. That’s really cool and all, but I am not in a position to buy a 5.1 surround sound setup. I am a very poor college student who can only afford to eat ramen noodles 4 times a week (The other times I eat the cardboard the ramen came in. I have a sad life). I set up my dad’s stereo from like the 80’s to be my “hi-fi” audio setup which replaces my TV’s stereo sound with a slightly less awful stereo sound. So when the DVD/Blu-Ray player outputs a 5.1 signal, my poor stereo speakers can only replicate the 2 front side speakers. This is why explosions are so loud. The dialogue is going to a non-existent center speaker, which is why it comes out so quiet.

So what’s the solution? Add two dialogue tracks. One mixed in good super old fashioned stereo and the other mixed in the fancy pants 5.1/7.1 goodness. This way I can set the volume to a comfortable volume, and leave it there. This may sound like a super easy solution, but I would hazard a guess that mixing audio is a very difficult task, and not one easily undertaken. However I think that it’s well worth it and shows that movie studios are willing to go the extra mile for those who still want to watch their favorite movies, but maybe aren’t the most well off.

Well, we have done an audio problem, So let’s finish this article with a visual problem. This is probably the two biggest problems I have modern movies today. Shaky Cam and jump cuts. For those unfamiliar with shaky cam as a concept, I am sorry that I have to be the one who has to tell you about it. Basically it’s the worst form of visual storytelling imaginable. That’s not the most telling description, is it? OK, so shaky cam is exactly what it sounds like. It’s basically the director telling the cameraman to shake the camera as hard as they can. This is in order to make the action look frantic. Sounds stupid right, but it’s a real thing. The problem with shaky cam is that it is made worse by terrible, quick, jumpy editing. This is also just what it sounds like. It is the use of a million and a half different cuts in order to convey frantic action. However in reality, it often make it so that the scene is impossible to understand. These are just the tools of the incredibly lazy. The use of these two tools in conjunction makes a movie’s action scenes a chore to watch, and impossible to understand. You have to actively try to piece together when the actors are being hit, because the shot never actually shows it. You hear a flurry of sound effects, and you see a blurry mess of hands and faces, but it’s just audio and visual garbage that the director is trying to pass off as incredible action.

The solution to this problem is actually pretty simple. Hire better directors. Directors that are good at their jobs will make the action look good without the use of cheap tricks and quick editing. There are fantastic directors when it comes to filming action. Take the Wachowski siblings. Sure, they have made a couple stinkers in the last couple years, but the first Matrix movie is incredibly well directed. There are uses of wide shots, so we so exactly what is going on, there’s just the right amount of slow motion so we really feel it when characters get hit. The score is used perfectly, so when the hero gets hit hard, the music slows down and gets quieter. The Subway scene in the matrix encapsulates all of that.

Contrast this from Alex Cross. The camera is literally just shaking. You don’t see the hits connect. You see the main character hit the villain and then after a cut you see the villain react. This is probably to cover up the fact that the actors were not properly choreographed.

Thinking About Filming With a Drone Above Dubai? Think Again

A guide for film enthusiasts wishing to film from the UAE’s skies.

Its Dubai 2016, and although we do not have flying cars and hover boards (at least, not real ones), we do have flight drones, and lots of them. While most people who own high-end models of drone aircraft do so for professional use, an increasing number of people have purchased the machines simply as toys. What many of them do not know (including a large number of film production companies in Dubai) is that drone usage with a camera within the UAE isĀ illegal, without the correct permissions and permits.

Recently The UAE General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) has asked light air sports enthusiasts, including drone enthusiasts, to fly their aircraft only in accredited clubs approved by the authority to address safety and security issues. Most notably, the GCAA also warned drone hobbyists against equipping their vehicles with laser devices, cameras and other projection devices. Doing so could result in your equipment being confiscated by the police with a hefty fine. So what are the basic rules?

Well all flying should take place within the visual line of sight of the user and not above 400 ft from ground level without the use of visual aids, such as binoculars and within the aircraft’s operational range.

Fly only during daytime and in good weather conditions and do not under any circumstances fly within five kilometers from any airports, helipads, landing areas or manned aircraft. Do not fly near any buildings, houses, private properties or persons and finally, unless you have approval do not fly for commercial purposes.

For filmmakers, film and media production companies in Dubai and other commercial users, drone pilots should get a No-Objection Certificate (NOC) from the Dubai Civil Aviation Authority (DCAA). This letter can be obtained after registration, pre-assessment and prior approval from the Dubai Film and TV Commission (DFTC).

It is essential to note that throughout the UAE there are laws pertaining to drone flying and not just Dubai, so you need to check with the corresponding emirate before taking off. Each emirate may have slightly different rules and regulations. Because this is a relatively new area of interest, local rules and laws may for a while be in a state of flux and subject to change; therefore it is essential to check with the DFCT and the DCAA before you start filming with your drone.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9354108

Coverage – Defining the Director’s Vision

Coverage is a term that refers to camera placement in capturing the scene’s actions. It affords different perspectives of characters and their telling the story. More than any other aspect of filmmaking coverage defines the director’s touch, his vision of the story. In essence, coverage is what the camera sees, and feels. Used creatively, coverage is a decided factor in the success of a movie.

While it refers most to camera placement, angles, and composition, it also relates to the movement of the camera and the length of the shot. Other factors include camera lenses, filters and the rhythm, pace and variety of shots

Coverage is what makes up the elements that are later edited together to make the movie. It’s a selection of shots that the editor can splice together to complete the scene. Because shots are duplicated in a number of takes, these shots provide the editor with many options, ways to tell the story. And while the editor may assemble the shots into a scene, it is the director who has the final say how this assemblage is completed.

To obtain coverage, it’s common practice to first shoot a master. A master shot includes all the elements or characters in one camera shot. It’s the long shot or wide angle shot that depicts the location, the major cast of characters and the action that will take place in a scene. The editor uses this master shot as a road map to assemble closer shots.

The coverage then moves in for a two shot (two people). This could be a frontal two shot and/or an over the shoulder two shot. While the frontal two shot depicts the relationship between the two characters, the over the shoulder two shot isolates mainly on one character’s action. This over the shoulder angle allows greater flexibility in editing as the scene can move back and forth between dialogue and/or reaction shots.

The close up is usually the final setup in shooting a sequence. This type of shot is focused on the upper body and face. It allows for the greatest expression of emotions. Like the over the shoulder two shot, it allows for considerable editing flexibility as the scene can go back and forth showing both the dialogue and reactions of each character. The choker close up can move in just below the collar and the extreme close up composed below the chin and cutting off some hair. These closer angles gather up subtle emotions and behaviors one would miss in longer shots.

Another common shot in the sequence is the cut away. This focuses on some element or object related to the scene but not evident in the previous series of shots. It could be a telltale cigarette butt in an ashtray or an incriminating drink glass left on the coffee table. A character’s observation or avoidance of these items quickly tells the story in visual terms. They also allow a departure from repetitious dialogue/reactions shots and set a new rhythm to the scene. There is an array of other camera shot available to the director to tell his story and these we will discuss later in this article.

What is important from the director’s point of view is what shots best will tell the story. Having worked on films as a script supervisor, production designer, and art director, I see firsthand the confusion when this question comes up. The most prominent solution is do a lot of takes from every which angle. On big budget movies this is allowable; however, when funds are limited, one must be more selective. This article gets into the selection parameters and develops a process whereby these choices are logical and prudent.

In dissecting a scene, one must talk about the pressing question the audience will ask and want answered. This question is the inertia that carries the story forward and creates audience involvement. They become invested in the situation, the characters and their problems.

For instance, in a scene between a cheating husband and his naive wife, the pressing question is will she discover his infidelity. The audience knows he’s a cheater and wonders when she will uncover this fact. Thus the coverage of this scene would focus mainly on her reaction to what he’s telling her. When will she find out he’s lying? The coverage would seek to isolate her internal questioning, her probing body language and the eventual realization and contrast this against his deceiving behavior. The scene is the pivotal moment in the story and demands to be handled appropriately. What camera angles and moves would you use to define this questioning and her realization?

There are numerous ways this could be done and the director has to decide which camera angles or moves best define his vision. This article discusses how these decisions are made and the factors that go into making them. Basically, it has to do with what the audience wants to see and how this desire can be fulfilled, delayed, or manipulated for best dramatic value.

How to Create a Low Budget Movie Soundtrack

I bet if you think of your favorite movie, you can hum the theme song or some of the music from that film. Music is an important part of a great movie- so important that Hollywood pays top composers huge amounts of money to create the perfect, catchy score.

If you’re needing music for your new movie, you can hire a composer to custom write music for each and every scene but that may strain your already tight budget. Don’t worry, you can find great, original music on the web and much of it is free or available for a very low price.

I’m talking about Royalty-free music. If you Google ‘royalty free alternative music’ for instance, you will find pages of websites that offer alternative rock music for free or for a small licensing fee. That’s the good news. The bad news is – you’re going to have to do a lot of digging to find the music that fits the mood of your movie.

The best way to start off is to create a rough list of the songs you will need. Perhaps you want a quick uptempo rock song for the opening credits or maybe you have a few steamy scenes where a slow blues number will work nicely. Once you have the basic ‘music outline’, you can start your search for royalty free music that will fit your movie. The same goes for short films or even personal YouTube videos. Make a plan.

I suggest looking for royalty free music sites that have their music categorized and are easy to navigate. You don’t want to waste hours of your time clicking on song titles, wondering what you’re going to hear next. Oh great it’s some cheesy accordion song!

The best royalty free music sites will have easy to navigate categories such as Progressive Rock, Symphony, Blues or Country Music. This makes it much easier to find the music you are looking for.

One feature that I find extremely valuable is the vocal and non-vocal versions of a particular song. This helps develop a ‘theme’ that can be recurring throughout your movie. (Think ‘Titanic’). A lot of soundtracks use the non-vocal version of the song to create a recurring mood for a few scenes and then hit the audience with the vocal version during the closing credits. Don’t be afraid to use the same song in a number of scenes. Think about the theme song for ‘the Godfather’ and how many times the same melody was used over and over to great effect.

An important thing to remember is to protect your work by using a standard or creative commons license. Even though the music may be royalty free, you will still need to credit the owner by using a creative commons license or purchase a license that gives you the right to use the music for a commercial application. Most royalty free sites offer a creative commons license for free and a standard license for $25 to $100.

Be sure the music has a clean, professional sound. It won’t be too hard to tell whether it was recorded in a professional studio or straight from a Casio keyboard. Test the music out on a quality sound system where you can hear the dynamics of the music. It may sound acceptable coming out of your $10 computer speaker but you better test it on a good sound system just to be sure.

After finding the songs you like, you will need to customize the soundtrack to fit your scenes. There are plenty of sound editing software programs out there like Avid Pro Tools or Logic Pro X that enable you to properly fade in, fade out, alter the timing and manipulate the music. Some video editing programs such as Adobe Premiere now include the same sound editing features, just not at the same level of quality.